remedy

The means by which the violation of a right is prevented, redressed, or compensated. Remedies are of four kinds: (1) By act of the party injured, the principal of which are defense, recaption, distress, entry, abatement, aud seizure; (2) by operation of law, as in the case of retainer and remitter; (3) by agreement between the parties, e. g., by accord and satisfaction and arbitration; and (4) by judicial remedy, e. g., action or suit. Sweet. See Kuapp v. McCaffrey, 177 U. S. 638, 20 Sup. Ct. 824, 44 L. Ed. 921; Missionary Soc. v. Ely, 56 Ohio St. 405, 47 N. E. 537; U. S. v. Lyman, 20 Fed. Cas. 1,024 ; Frost v. Witter, 132 Cal. 421, 64 Pac. 705, 84 Am. St. Rep. 53. Also a certain allowance to the master of the mint, for deviation from the standard weight and fiueuess of coins. Enc. Lond.

Black’s Law Dictionary (Second Pocket Ed. 2011).

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